Summer School on Time, Money and God

4 – 8 July 2022, University of Antwerp

The Antwerp Summer School for 2022 will focus on fundamental questions about our financial system on the nature of time, value and money. You get a stimulating engagement with key topics and thinkers at the intersection of philosophy, economics, ethics and theology.

Contemporary discussions on the ethics of finance and the prospects of more sustainable banking systems surface on regular occasions, not just at the edge of the financial system but also at its core. It is not just a Western concern as the rapid rise of Islamic banking proves. In its origin, many of these concerns with finance have a religious background, but today what might have seemed like unnecessary religious fetters in the secular world of finance have become general concerns because of the ongoing financial, economic and environmental crises. 

This summer school returns to the historical roots of the criticism of the financial system and looks at the usury debate from the contemporary perspective of banking and economic decision making on long term horizons. What can the contemporary debate learn from the moral and theological frameworks that were employed in the usury debate? The summer school offers an interdisciplinary program aimed at untangling the moral, economical, metaphysical and theological dimensions of that debate. Many of these arguments come back in the contemporary Islamic discussion on usury and play a strong part in discussions about things as diverse as nuclear energy, climate change and our relation to future generations. 

Speakers

Wim Decock: “Money, Time and Industry: Lessius and the Breakdown of the Scholastic Paradigm on Interest-Taking and Usury”

Philip Goodchild: “Credit and Debt: Between theology and economics” | “Finance as Salvation”

Bruno Colmant: “Melting money: the view from a physiocrat”

Sean Capener: “The So-Called ’Thief of Time’” |  “Money and Sophistry”

Imane Karich: “Theory and practice of Islamic finance”

Luc van Liedekerke: “The economics of time preference” | “Time-preference and climate change”

Michaël Bauwens: “Time, money and God: metaphysical investigations”

Target group

Master and PhD students in philosophy, economics or theology, but open to advanced Bachelor, Master and PhD students in these three or closely related fields like Islamic finance, sustainable finance and others. Participants should have at least completed two full years of undergraduate education (Bachelor level). 

For more information: https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/summer-winter-schools/time-money-god/

Workshop on the Ontology of Finance

Venue: Park 141, University at Buffalo (North Campus) & Zoom
Date: Saturday, May 7, 2022

This will be a hybrid meeting. Those intending to participate in person should contact Gloria Sansò <gsanso@buffalo.edu> before May 5. Zoom details will be posted later.

The workshop is funded by the International Social Ontology Society (ISOS) and by the Department of Philosophy, University at Buffalo

Program:

φ = speaker will be physically present

9:00 am Barry Smith: Introduction and welcome φ
9:15 am Achille Varzi: Derivatus Paradoxus φ
10:00 am Olivier Massin: Providing, exchanging, selling
Break
10:45 am Francesco Guala: Performativity rationalized
11:15 am Emiliano Ippoliti: What is a financial crisis
11:45 am Asya Passinsky: Cryptocurrency: commodity or credit?
Lunch
13:15 pm Samir Chopra: From artifact to agent: artificial agents and the law of legal agency φ
14:00 pm Gloria Sansò: Foundations for an ontology of finance φ
14:30 pm Christian Sprague: Towards a market ontology φ

Please consult the webpage for more information.

4th Workshop of the Ethics of Debt Network

Venue: Campus Brussels, University of Maastricht

Date: 14-15 July 2022

The Ethics of Debt Network brings together researchers from various disciplines working on the ethics of debt, money, and finance, broadly construed. We welcome contributions from any discipline and methodological perspective shedding light on normative questions related to household, commercial, and sovereign debt. We welcome both empirical studies raising normative questions, and normative studies engaging with empirical literature. We equally appreciate both ethical perspectives focusing on what particular actors in the credit system ought to do as well as perspectives from political philosophy analyzing/critiquing the principles, discourses and/or institutions concerning debt, money and finance.

The goal of the workshop is to give participants high-quality feedback on work-in-progress. We will have ample opportunity to reflect on shared research challenges and discuss cross-cutting themes. Paper drafts will be read by participants before the event to allow for in-depth discussions during the event. We are looking for papers at an early stage of development, ready for constructive feedback from a friendly, specialist audience.

Format
All participants are expected to read the work-in-progress papers in advance of the workshop. Speakers will set the stage for the discussion, but will not recap the content of the paper.

If you would like to present or attend, please complete our registration FORM. In the form, indicate that you would like to present and paste your abstract of up to 500 words until 4 April 2022. We will inform you shortly thereafter if your abstract has been accepted.

If you have any questions, please send us a message to ethicsofdebt@gmail.com.

Funds
Limited funds are available to cover travel and accommodation costs of speakers.

Acknowledgements
This workshop is funded by the York Maastricht Partnership Investment Fund.

Organizers
Aleksander Masternak, Graduate Student and Teaching Assistant, Department of Political Science, McGill University, aleksander.masternak@mail.mcgill.ca

Janosch Prinz, Assistant Professor in Social and Political Philosophy, Department of Philosophy, Maastricht University, j.prinz@maastrichtuniversity.nl

Financial Ethics Workshop – September 16-17

The Financial Ethics Research Group (University of Gothenburg, Sweden) is organizing its first “Financial Ethics Workshop” on September 16-17. See the detailed schedule below.

The workshop will be held on zoom. Registration is free but mandatory. Please send an email to <louis.larue.2@gu.se> no later than September 14.

Following the workshop, a planned book on the philosophy of money and finance, edited by Joakim Sandberg and Lisa Warenski, is due to be published by Oxford University Press.

Note: Time indicated below is UCT+2 (Central European Summer Time)

Thursday 16 SeptemberTitle
10h30 – Joakim Sandberg (University of Gothenburg )Welcome address.
11h Adrian Walsh (University of New England, Australia)Financial Ethics and the Moral Status of the Profit Motive
12h Lunch 
13h Boudewijn de Bruin (University of Groningen)Reflexive Law and Epistemic Virtues: The EU Sustainable Finance Action Plan
14h Richard Endörfer (University of Gothenburg)What precisely is Wrong with Banks Contributing to Financial Crises?
15h Break 
15h30 Lisa Warenski (CUNY)Epistemic Dimensions of Culture and Conduct
16h30 Aaron James (University of California, Irvine)Rawls, Lerner, and the Tax-and-Spend Booby Trap
Friday 17 September 
9h30 – Welcome 
10h Marco Meyer (University of Hamburg)Credit and Distributive Justice
11h Christopher J. Cowton (Huddersfield Business School)Truth in financial accounting
12h Lunch 
13h Clément Fontan (UCLouvain)Beating around the (green) bush: central banks in face of the environmental meltdown.
14h Joshua Preiss (Minnesota State University)Freedom and the Ends of Financial Market Reform

Conference on Climate Change Adaptation Finance, September 6-7

The programme for the conference on “Climate Change Adaptation Finance: Normative and Empirical Perspectives” is now online. It includes a Keynote by Stacy-Ann Robinson (accessible without registration) and a Panel Discussion with representatives from governments, NGOs, policy advice and science. The full programme and further information are available at: https://www.adjust-climate.org/en/conference-2021/

The online conference takes place from September 6 to 7 and registration is free. Just send an email to Jochen Heubach (jheubach@philsem.uni-kiel.de) until September 1, saying that you want to participate in the conference.

The conference brings together leading scholars working on adaptation finance who will present their work on topics such as risk reduction, justice & equity, access to finance, reporting and allocative issues. From a variety of perspectives and disciplines, it aims at discussing how to achieve an effective and fair distribution of available adaptation finance and how to increase that funding.

Summer School on “The Workings of Capital: Perspectives on Exploitation in Law, Labor, and Distribution”

When: July 15-17, 2021

Where: The school will be held online. We will monitor existing conditions and regulations, and if possible, we will move the event to a blended format, featuring on-campus lectures and online sessions. In case of a blended format, the event will be hosted at the Auditorium of the Institute of Letters and Human Sciences (ILCH) at the ​University of Minho, Braga.

Organization: This event is co-organized by the Centre for Ethics, Politics, and Society of the University of Minho, and the Philosophy Department of the University of York

Convenors: Catarina Neves, Daniele Santoro, and Pedro Teixeira

Speakers:  Martin O’Neill (University of York), Katharina Pistor (Columbia University), João Rodrigues (Universidade de Coimbra), Nicholas Vrousalis (University of Rotterdam)

Website: https://12thsummerschoolcepsbraga.weebly.com

Description
Since Marx’s early theorization, exploitation has been identified as a defining feature of the capitalist mode of production. Exploitation sheds light on the causes of the unfair distribution of resources, opportunities, and wealth, the commodification of the labor market, as well as the plundering of natural resources. It also has the normative significance of both a moral wrongdoing and a structural aspect of an unjust system that calls for change, activism, and revolution once again. As inequalities soar and the concentration of wealth lacerates the social fabric of traditional welfare state societies, the exploitative nature of late-stage capitalism has drawn the attention of a new generation of political philosophers, both in the critical and the analytical tradition.

How does capitalist exploitation take place through legal, distribution, and productive means?  How should we understand the conceptual and normative dimensions of exploitation, and what policies should be pursued to create a less exploitative form of production? The goal of the 12th edition is to answer this question by exploring the role exploitation plays within new forms of capitalist production.

The critique of capitalism is a recurrent theme of the School. In past editions, we discussed alternatives to the existing capitalist regime, such as property-owning democracy (2014) and democratic socialism (2018). We also questioned the legitimacy of free-market capitalism and the role of corporations (2019). 

Our aim in this edition is to elucidate the concept of exploitation, investigate its distributive implications for public policy, its impact on labor and the labor market, and the legal framework enabling exploitative processes.

Among the questions we are particularly interested in debating are the following:   

  • What is exploitation? Is exploitation always unjust? How to distinguish exploitation from other forms of moral wrongdoing?
  • What taxonomy of exploitation can we identify in capitalistic and socialist regimes?
  • Are new forms of exploitation essentially distinct from traditional forms of exploitation?
  • Which are the forms of labor most affected by current forms of exploitation? How can decommodification mitigate individuals’ exploitation in the labor market?
  • How can policies of predistribution and/or redistribution address issues of exploitation?
  • Can egalitarian policies mitigate exploitation, and if so, which ones are the most effective?
  • Can exploitation happen in an egalitarian society, and what can we do about it?
  • What is the role of the law in perpetuating inequality and exploitation, especially through financial markets?

Format

The school will take place over three days. Two invited lectures will be delivered each day. We invite the participation of Ph.D. students, postdoctoral scholars, and established researchers to join us in the discussion and present their ongoing work on these topics or any related theme. Abstract proposals should not exceed 500 words. To submit a proposal, visit the School’s website.

Deadline for Abstract submission: May 30, 2021
Applicants who only wish to attend the summer school, and do not want to submit a proposal, should only register for the event (see information below).

Participation

Due to travel restrictions that could still affect on-site participation next Summer, the School is being organized in a digital format this year. We hope that delivering the event online will encourage proposals from many who might be hesitating to commit to an in-person event, giving the current uncertainty. We will follow the changes in travel restrictions and the regulations in Portugal regarding international academic events. In case the situation changes, we will consider a blended format for the school, and we will inform all participants. More information about the format will be provided closer to the date of the school. For now, participants will be asked to submit their preferences for the school’s format.

The participation fee is 30 Euros in case the school takes place online. In case we are able to organize a partial in-person event, we will ask participants to increase the fee up to 50 Euros to cover expenses.  Detailed information about registration and payment procedures are available on the School’s website.

Deadline for registration: June 20, 2021. ​​

Information about the program and the school format will be available later on the website. 

For other queries, contact: 12thbragasummerschool@gmail.com

Climate Futures Workshop 2021: Climate Solutions, Money, and Politics

Asynchronous / Online / June 16-30

https://cfi-onlineworkshop.net/2021-cfa

All solutions to climate change—whether mitigation, adaptation, or compensation—play out against a backdrop of domestic and global financial, economic, and political systems. Proposed climate solutions raise issues of justice as well as politics and finance. The complex interplay of these issues calls for conversation and collaboration across disciplinary boundaries.

Visions of a Just Transition, a Green New Deal, or a Green Recovery from COVID-19 have captivated imaginations: but to what extent should responses to climate change be intertwined with radical social, economic, or political transformation? Fossil fuel companies facing asset stranding have obstructed climate solutions: but do they hold the key to developing carbon dioxide removal technologies? Renewable energy remains generally capital-intensive: how can we incentivise breakthrough innovations? Future generations will benefit significantly from action on climate change today: should we “borrow from the future” to fund a clean energy transition?

Facilitating conversations addressing such questions is the aim of this year’s Climate Futures Workshop. We outline some other possible questions below:

Broad

  • What role should we take self-interest to play in climate finance and politics, and how should self-interested motivations be constrained and channeled?
  • Is it feasible or desirable for future generations to bear any of the costs of current mitigation measures?
  • How do climate solutions connect with social movements for political and climate justice?

Narrow

  • Can fossil-fuel firms transform themselves from part of the problem to part of the solution? Can and should they be forgiven for their past roles in causing climate change and obstructing action to mitigate it? What kinds of constructive contributions can they offer? How can the various resources of fossil-fuel companies be redirected for developing climate solutions?
  • Developed countries agreed in Paris to a goal of “mobilising” $100bn per year by 2020 in climate finance. How should “mobilisation” be understood? How can climate finance be made more effective?
  • Can payments for ecosystem services such as natural carbon sinks be both just and effective?
  • What balance of command-and-control or pricing instruments will best achieve climate justice?
  • What role should economic measurements of the social cost of carbon play in setting climate policy, given the theoretical and practical difficulties of an accurate assessment?
  • Is buying fossil fuel reserves in order to keep them in the ground a feasible strategy?
  • Can changes in corporate governance incentivise increased investment in climate change adaptation?

Presenters

  • Robert Keohane
  • John Broome
  • Rebecca Henderson
  • Michael Oppenheimer
  • Simon Caney
  • Alyssa Bernstein
  • Paul Kelleher
  • Rachel Kyte
  • Angel Hsu
  • Alexandre Gajevic Sayegh
  • Matto Mildenberger
  • Jessica Green
  • Thea Riofrancos

Organizers

The Climate Futures Workshop 2021 is sponsored by the Climate Futures Initiative, the High Meadows Environmental Institute, and the Center for Human Values at Princeton University.

CFP: Ethics of Business, Trade & Global Governance – An Online Conference

Date:  Friday, December 4, 2020
Proposal Submission Deadline: September 15, 2020
Plenary Speaker: Douglas Irwin, John French Professor of Economics, Dartmouth College

The Saint Anselm College Center for Ethics in Business and Governance, in cooperation with the Department of Finance—University of Vienna and the University of St. Andrews Centre for Responsible Banking & Finance, announces a call for proposals for a one-day conference on the economics, ethics and governance of global commerce.

International trade policies and disputes have dominated domestic and international politics.  From the continued negotiations in the EU and the UK over Brexit to US/China tariff “battles,” the questions and debates over international trade and capital flows will not be going away, particularly in the midst, and in the aftermath, of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Many of these trade discussions highlight the economic benefits and costs of individual trade deals or policies without examining the diverse ethical, economic, social and political ramifications of globalization and trade for global actors as well as for local communities and businesses. What is needed now is a more comprehensive, interdisciplinary discussion of the complexities of international commerce.

The goal of this one-day conference is to bring together ethicists, economists, political scientists, international relations scholars, policy experts, and business leaders to examine not only the political and economic impact of globalization but also how international trade and investment can be conducted more ethically.

Continue reading

Workshop: Extreme wealth as a moral problem

Date: 13-14 November 2019.
Location: Emil-Figge-Str. 50, 44127 Dortmund (Germany), room 0.442
Organisers: Christian Neuhäuser and Dick Timmer

Attendance is free. Limited number of places available. Please register via k.d.timmer@uu.nl or Christian.Neuhaeuser@udo.edu.

Questions about the accumulation of wealth have acquired a new urgency in recent years. Economic inequality is fierce and still rising, both within countries and on a global level. It contributes to, among other things, social and political inequality and distributive unfairness. In light of this, there is a pressing need for work in normative political theory that engages closely with the question of what the justice has to say about the rich and their wealth. Are there distinctive features about the rich compared to the ‘merely’ affluent that we should worry about in particular? Should there be limits to how much wealth and income people can appropriate? And what kinds of institutions and policies are most defensible in curtailing the harmful effects of extreme wealth?

In this workshop, we want to consider the place extreme wealth should have in thinking about justice. We do this by critically examining ‘limitarianism’, which is the view in distributive justice which advocates that it is not morally permissible to have more resources than are needed to fully flourish in life. Ingrid Robeyns (2018) has coined and defended this view, arguing for limits on wealth in order to protect political equality and meet unmet urgent needs.

Provisional schedule

13th November
16.00-17.00: Ingrid Robeyns (Utrecht), “Economic limitarianism: merely moral or also political?”
17.15-18.15: Alan Thomas (York), “Limitarianism and the Political Problem of the Rich”
19.00: Dinner

14th November
9.00-10.00: Stefan Gosepath (Berlin), “Problems with too much (inherited) wealth”
10.15-11.15: Tammy Harel Ben Shahar (Haifa), “Limitarianism and Relative Thresholds”
11.30-12.30: Alexandru Volacu (Bucharest) “Some Reasons to Qualify Orthodox Limitarianism”
12.30-14.00: Lunch
14.00-15.00: Annelien De Dijn (Utrecht), “Republicanism and egalitarism”
15.15-16.15: Lasse Nielsen (Odense), “Limitarianism and social flourishing”
16.30-17.30: Dick Timmer (Utrecht) & Huub Brouwer (Utrecht) “Earning Too Much: The Case For Maximum Income Policies”
19.00 Dinner

CFP: Money: What is it? How should it function?

When: November 1-2, 2019
Where: University of Groningen, the Netherlands
Invited speakers:
– Eyja Brynjarsdóttir (University of Iceland)
– Francesco Guala (Milan)
– Uskali Mäki (Helsinki)
– J.P. Smit (Stellenbosch)

Deadline: Please submit an abstract before June 15 to r.d.doody@rug.nl.
Number of words: 1,000. A limited number of submissions will be accepted for presentation. Full papers are due on October 1, 2019.
The Journal of Social Ontology (JSO) will publish a special issue dedicated to papers presented at this conference.

Topic. Money used to be a simple thing in practice: a set of coins and notes. It was of course more complicated in theory, and scholars throughout history have discussed what it is that makes those coins and notes into money: certain natural properties (that are inherent in gold or silver) or certain social properties (being generally accepted and used or being backed by the state).

While these discussions continue, over the last few decades money has also become more complicated in practice. Besides the old coins and notes, we now have electronic money of various sorts, including a large array of digital currencies such as Bitcoin. This is a good time to take the age-old philosophical discussions to a new and more complex level.

Some of the puzzles that new forms of money raise are:

  • How can money have a virtual existence?
  • Can the institution of money function without state support and if so how?
  • Is it possible to develop a unified theory of commodity, fiat and electronic money?

The ontological issues here often lie close to normative issues and debates. For example,

  • Is there a moral right to choose whatever currency one wants?
  • Will new forms of money eventually violate the public’s trust in stability and justice?

This conference brings together experts on the ontology, economics, ethics and politics of money to develop novel answers to questions such as these.

Organizing institutions:
Financial Ethics Research Group of the University of Gothenburg
– Department of Financial Economics of the Faculty of Economics and Business
Centre for Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) of the University of Groningen

Organizing committee: Ryan Doody, Frank Hindriks, Joakim Sandberg