Essay Contest ‘The Future of Capitalism in Europe’

The Future Markets Consultation invites students and young scholars to submit their ideas on a sustainable and just market economy for Europe in the shape of an essay. A prize is available in three categories: (1) bachelor students, (2) master & PhD students and (3) young scholars until 35 years.

What we are looking for
The length of your essay should be at most 3,500 words including notes and references. Your essay should be aimed at an educated, yet non-academic public. A preference will be given to essays that do not just analyze the current situation, but also suggest ways to move forward.

What happens to your essay
All essays will be taken into account as input for the final report of the Future Markets Consultation. A selection of the best essays will be published on both the consultation website and on the Moral Markets portal.

Essay topics
You can write an essay on any topic that is of relevance to the consultation, including but not limited to:

  • Markets, government & civil society
  • How to deal with growing inequality
  • The desirability & necessity of economic growth
  • Sustainability & markets
  • Economics & the common good
  • Democratizing the economy
  • The role of civil society in capitalism
  • Business as a force for good
  • Dealing with corporate power concentrations
  • The role of work in the economy of the future
  • Reforming finance & financial institutions
  • The mix of global & local / smart globalisation
  • The spiritual & moral foundations of capitalism
  • The potential for cooperatives
  • Stimulating sustainable growth
  • True pricing

For more suggestions for relevant topics, please check our website.

Deadline: 3 January December 2021
For information on the essay contest, please visit:
https://www.moralmarkets.org/futuremarketsconsultation/activities/essay-contest/

CFP: Ethics of Business, Trade & Global Governance – An Online Conference

Date:  Friday, December 4, 2020
Proposal Submission Deadline: September 15, 2020
Plenary Speaker: Douglas Irwin, John French Professor of Economics, Dartmouth College

The Saint Anselm College Center for Ethics in Business and Governance, in cooperation with the Department of Finance—University of Vienna and the University of St. Andrews Centre for Responsible Banking & Finance, announces a call for proposals for a one-day conference on the economics, ethics and governance of global commerce.

International trade policies and disputes have dominated domestic and international politics.  From the continued negotiations in the EU and the UK over Brexit to US/China tariff “battles,” the questions and debates over international trade and capital flows will not be going away, particularly in the midst, and in the aftermath, of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Many of these trade discussions highlight the economic benefits and costs of individual trade deals or policies without examining the diverse ethical, economic, social and political ramifications of globalization and trade for global actors as well as for local communities and businesses. What is needed now is a more comprehensive, interdisciplinary discussion of the complexities of international commerce.

The goal of this one-day conference is to bring together ethicists, economists, political scientists, international relations scholars, policy experts, and business leaders to examine not only the political and economic impact of globalization but also how international trade and investment can be conducted more ethically.

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Seventh Annual Amartya Sen Essay Prize 2020

This year, Global Financial Integrity and Academics Stand Against Poverty will be awarding the seventh annual Amartya Sen Prizes to the two best original essays examining one particular component of illicit financial flows, the resulting harms and possible avenues of reform. Entered essays should be about 7,000 to 9,000 words long. There is a first prize of $5,000 and a second prize of $3,000.

Illicit financial flows are generally defined as cross-border movements of funds that are illegally earned, transferred, or used. Examples are funds earned through illegal trafficking in persons, drugs or weapons; funds illegally transferred through mispriced exchanges (e.g., among affiliates of a multinational corporation seeking to shift profits to reduce taxes); funds moved to evade taxes; and funds used for corruption of or by public or corporate officials. Illicit financial flows are explicitly recognized as an obstacle to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and singled out as a separate target #4 of SDG 16.

Components of illicit financial flows can be delimited by sector and geographically. Delimitation by sector might focus your essay on some specific activity, business or industry – such as art, real estate, health care, technology, entertainment, shipping, agriculture, sports, gaming, education, politics, tourism, natural resource extraction, banking and financial services – or on an even narrower subsector such as the diamond trade, hunting, insurance or prostitution. Delimitation by geography might further narrow the essay’s focus to some particular country, province or region.

Your essay should describe the problematic activity and evaluate the adverse effects of it that make it problematic. Also, in quantitative terms insofar as this is possible, you should estimate the magnitude of the relevant outflows as well as the damage they do to the institutions and to the affected populations. This might include harm from abuse, exploitation and impoverishment of individuals, harm through subdued economic activity and reduced prosperity, and/or harm through diminished tax revenues that depress public spending.

Your essay should also explain the persistence of the harmful activity in terms of relevant incentives and enabling conditions and, based on your explanation, propose plausible ways to curtail the problem. Such reform efforts might be proposed at diverse levels, including supranational rules, national rules, corporate policies, professional ethics, individual initiatives, or any combination thereof. The task is to identify who has the responsibility, the capacity and (potentially) the knowledge and motivation to change behavior toward effective curtailment.

We welcome authors from diverse academic disciplines and from outside the academy. Please send your entry by email attachment on or before 31 August 2020 to senprize@gfintegrity.org. While your email should identify you, your essay should be stripped of self-identifying references, formatted for blind review.

CFP: Money: What is it? How should it function?

When: November 1-2, 2019
Where: University of Groningen, the Netherlands
Invited speakers:
– Eyja Brynjarsdóttir (University of Iceland)
– Francesco Guala (Milan)
– Uskali Mäki (Helsinki)
– J.P. Smit (Stellenbosch)

Deadline: Please submit an abstract before June 15 to r.d.doody@rug.nl.
Number of words: 1,000. A limited number of submissions will be accepted for presentation. Full papers are due on October 1, 2019.
The Journal of Social Ontology (JSO) will publish a special issue dedicated to papers presented at this conference.

Topic. Money used to be a simple thing in practice: a set of coins and notes. It was of course more complicated in theory, and scholars throughout history have discussed what it is that makes those coins and notes into money: certain natural properties (that are inherent in gold or silver) or certain social properties (being generally accepted and used or being backed by the state).

While these discussions continue, over the last few decades money has also become more complicated in practice. Besides the old coins and notes, we now have electronic money of various sorts, including a large array of digital currencies such as Bitcoin. This is a good time to take the age-old philosophical discussions to a new and more complex level.

Some of the puzzles that new forms of money raise are:

  • How can money have a virtual existence?
  • Can the institution of money function without state support and if so how?
  • Is it possible to develop a unified theory of commodity, fiat and electronic money?

The ontological issues here often lie close to normative issues and debates. For example,

  • Is there a moral right to choose whatever currency one wants?
  • Will new forms of money eventually violate the public’s trust in stability and justice?

This conference brings together experts on the ontology, economics, ethics and politics of money to develop novel answers to questions such as these.

Organizing institutions:
Financial Ethics Research Group of the University of Gothenburg
– Department of Financial Economics of the Faculty of Economics and Business
Centre for Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) of the University of Groningen

Organizing committee: Ryan Doody, Frank Hindriks, Joakim Sandberg

CFP: The Soul of Economics

Location: University of Zurich, Switzerland
Date: September 9-11, 2019
Website: https://urlproxy.sunet.se/canit/urlproxy.php?_q=aHR0cHM6Ly9zb3Vsb2ZlY29ub21pY3MyMDE5LndlZWJseS5jb20%3D&_s=eHNham9h&_c=c2b556fe&_r=Z3Utc2U%3D

List of confirmed invited speakers

  • Erik Angner (Stockholm University)
  • Alvin Birdi (University of Bristol)
  • Beatrice Cherrier (CNRS & THEMA, University of Cergy Pontoise)
  • Kevin Hoover (Duke University)
  • Andreas Ortmann (University of South Wales)
  • Don Ross (University of Cork)
  • (additional speakers to be confirmed)

The occasion for this conference is the 10-year passing of the global financial crisis in 2007-08. The emphasis lies in particular on debates that have sparked or revived issues concerning the main constituents of the ‘soul of economics’ and have provoked new questions about the nature of this soul. More specifically, we focus mainly on questions that have been raised within but also outside the economics profession about some of the constituents of this soul, namely the discipline’s theoretical foundations, the desirability of old and new modeling tools, the role of empirical analysis in economics, and the usefulness of research programs such as behavioral economics, among many others. We furthermore address questions the crisis has provoked concerning the lack of public trust in economics and how to regain it.

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CFP: Data & Ethics Conference

Venue: Stift Klosterneuburg (Klosterneuburg, Austria)
Date: November 22-23, 2019

The Department of Finance at University of Vienna, in cooperation with the Saint Anselm College Center for Ethics in Business and Governance, NH, USA, and the University of St. Andrews Centre for Responsible Banking & Finance, St. Andrews, Scotland, announces a call for proposals for an interdisciplinary conference on the Data & Ethics in times of the industrial revolution 4.0.

The accelerating digitalization brings up new challenges across various areas such economics, finance, medicine, biology, technology, or energy. These challenges come along with ethical questions that arise within affected disciplines, e.g. questions from cyber-security, privacy issues, job-security, shifts in economic frameworks, to technological progress in biology and the use of big data. Moreover, the tensions between efficiency, security and freedom are moving to the core of societal reform.

The goal of this conference is to bring together ethicists, economists, technological experts, and business leaders to comprehensively examine not only the political, economic and technological impact of big data, but also how big data can be used responsibly to the global benefit of society.

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CFP: Philosophy for Finance – Theory and Practice

TOPOI – An International Review of Philosophy
Special Issue: Philosophy for Finance: Theory and Practice
Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2018
Guest Editor: Emiliano Ippoliti (Sapienza University of Rome)

Overview
The issue will deal with the relation between philosophy and finance. On the one hand it will explore the ways finance is approached theoretically and practically. On the other, it will look at how financial dynamics suggests new approaches to our understanding of social systems and provides novel solutions.
Finance has been broadly conceptualized in either an internal or external view. These employ radically different ‘philosophies’ and assumptions about the ontology, the methods, what counts as data, and the role of mathematical modelling, amongst others.
The internal view maintains that we can make sense of and profit from the behavior of stock markets by looking for patterns and regularities in sets of data. It holds that, since their behavior does not principally depend on contextual or domain-specific factors (see e.g. econophysics), it can be detected and studied through a mathematical lens.
The external view maintains that in order to study, understand, and profit from financial markets, it is necessary to acquire as much knowledge as possible about their internal machinery: rules of trade executions, laws, institutions, regulators, the behavior and psychology of traders and investors.
The issue will examine both views with the aim of providing theoretical and practical answers to questions about how to acquire understanding of stock markets behavior. Moreover, we will explore how the functioning of financial systems affects related theories and, in turn, how the use of certain theories and models affects financial practice.
The issue will contain a selection of invited contributions by leading experts in the field. There will also be a call for papers and we will be especially interested in publishing contributions that focus on an original exploration of the relation between finance and philosophy. A non-exhaustive list of topics includes: sociology of finance; mathematics and finance; ethics and finance; modelling of financial systems; performative dynamics; the status of finance as a discipline; quantitative vs qualitative approaches to finance.
An analysis of specific case studies from stock markets will be very welcome.

The invited contributors include:
– Ping Chen (China Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai-China / University of Texas)
– Boudewijn de Bruin (University of Groningen)
– Ivan Boldyrev (Radboud University Nijmegen)
– Mark Lenglet (European Business School – Paris)
– Paolo Barucca (University of Zurich)
– Christian Walter (MSH – Paris)
– Giulia Miotti (Sapienza University of Rome)
– Wessel Reijers (Dublin City University)
– Emiliano Ippoliti (Sapienza University of Rome)
– Alex Preda (University College London)

Submission
All papers will be subject to double-blind peer-review.
To submit, go to Topoi’s online editorial manager: https://www.editorialmanager.com/topo/default.aspx (you have to register).
After logging in, click on ‘Submit New Manuscript’ and select the item “S.I. Philosophy for Finance (Ippoliti)” from the menu ‘Article Type’. Please note that you are requested to upload two doc files:
– one for the blinded manuscript (that is, containing title, abstract but not your details–name, surname, affiliation, etc.)
– one (a 1-page file) containing only the title of the paper, your details (affiliation, email, etc.), the acknowledgment, if any, and the following declarations: a) this study did/did not receive any funding; b) conflict of Interest: I declare that he has no conflict of interest; c) ethical approval: this article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

Length: Papers should not exceed 50.000 characters including spaces.

For any further information please contact: Emiliano Ippoliti, emiliano.ippoliti@uniroma1.it

CFP: Futures of finance and society

FSN 2018: Futures of finance and society
University of Edinburgh, 6-7 December

Organisers: Nathan Coombs, Tod Van Gunten
Keynotes: Donald MacKenzie, Annelise Riles, Gillian Tett
Sponsors: Edinburgh Futures Institute/University of Edinburgh

Ten years on from the global financial crisis, the settlement between finance and society remains ambiguous. Regulation has been tightened in traditional areas like banking, against a backdrop of fiscal austerity and the proliferation of new monies, financial platforms and investment vehicles. Building on the success of our previous ‘Intersections of finance and society’ conferences, ‘Futures of finance and society’ asks what new social, organisational and political forms are emerging and what direction they should take.

This two-day event, based at the University of Edinburgh’s historic Medical Quad, aims to deepen dialogue between the diverse disciplines contributing to the field of ‘finance and society’ studies. It seeks to develop new synergies between political, sociological, historical, and philosophical perspectives. In addition to providing a venue for presenting ongoing theoretical research, contributors are invited to propose and debate potential solutions for improving financial stability, expanding financial inclusion, and mitigating inequalities associated with financialisation.

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CFP: “Managing and Financing Responsible Businesses”

Maastricht, the Netherlands, September 5-6, 2018

Inaugural Conference of the Global Research Alliance for Sustainable Finance and Investment
Hosted by the European Centre for Corporate Engagement (ECCE), Maastricht University School of Business and Economics, The Netherlands

Keynote Speakers:
Alex Edmans (London Business School)
Tima Bansal (Ivey Business School)

The Global Research Alliance for Sustainable Finance and Investment (GRASFI), a new network of global research universities established to promote rigorous and highly impactful academic research on sustainable finance and investment, is holding its inaugural conference at the European Centre for Corporate Engagement (ECCE) at Maastricht University School of Business and Economics. The conference, which is entitled “Managing and Financing Responsible Businesses”, will host papers on sustainability with major contributions to complementary disciplines such as finance, accounting, management, strategy and development economics.

The Conference Committee encourages submissions of thought-provoking working papers with either theoretical, empirical, or methodological and research-design contributions. Examples of topics include:

  • The business of business:  profit, purpose, and alternative organizational forms
  • Making sustainability an integral part of companies: implications for strategy, management, finance & accounting
  • Climate change: implications for businesses and institutional investors
  • The role of corporate governance mechanisms and active ownership in promoting sustainability
  • Impact investing: measuring social impact alongside business results
  • Behavioural factors affecting individuals and the sustainability of markets
  • Philanthropy and effective altruism
  • Big data, FinTech and financial innovation for sustainability
  • Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Deadline for Paper Submission: April 30, 2018

For more information visit the conference website

Rethinking Finance Conference

Where: BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo
When: April 12 – 13, 2018

The Rethinking Finance Conference is organized as a cooperation between Rethinking Economics Norway, The Center for Financial Regulation at the Norwegian Business School BI, the Finance Watch and the INET YSI Financial Stability WG. Main confirmed speakers are Sheila Dow, Ann Pettifor, Daniela Gabor and Rohan Grey.

More information will be launched soon at www.rethinkingeconomicsnorge.com/
rethinking-finance/

ALSO NOTE: The INET YSI Financial Stability working group (WG) is organising a workshop as part of the Rethinking Finance Conference in Oslo on April 14th, 2018. The purpose of this workshop is to invite young scholars to present their work and discuss “Finance in the 21st Century” as well as related financial stability issues across the world.

Limited travel support and accommodation will be offered. The deadline for submitting the abstracts and short statements is February 10th, 2018. Please send your abstracts to: fs@youngscholarsinitiative.org