Summer School on Time, Money and God

4 – 8 July 2022, University of Antwerp

The Antwerp Summer School for 2022 will focus on fundamental questions about our financial system on the nature of time, value and money. You get a stimulating engagement with key topics and thinkers at the intersection of philosophy, economics, ethics and theology.

Contemporary discussions on the ethics of finance and the prospects of more sustainable banking systems surface on regular occasions, not just at the edge of the financial system but also at its core. It is not just a Western concern as the rapid rise of Islamic banking proves. In its origin, many of these concerns with finance have a religious background, but today what might have seemed like unnecessary religious fetters in the secular world of finance have become general concerns because of the ongoing financial, economic and environmental crises. 

This summer school returns to the historical roots of the criticism of the financial system and looks at the usury debate from the contemporary perspective of banking and economic decision making on long term horizons. What can the contemporary debate learn from the moral and theological frameworks that were employed in the usury debate? The summer school offers an interdisciplinary program aimed at untangling the moral, economical, metaphysical and theological dimensions of that debate. Many of these arguments come back in the contemporary Islamic discussion on usury and play a strong part in discussions about things as diverse as nuclear energy, climate change and our relation to future generations. 

Speakers

Wim Decock: “Money, Time and Industry: Lessius and the Breakdown of the Scholastic Paradigm on Interest-Taking and Usury”

Philip Goodchild: “Credit and Debt: Between theology and economics” | “Finance as Salvation”

Bruno Colmant: “Melting money: the view from a physiocrat”

Sean Capener: “The So-Called ’Thief of Time’” |  “Money and Sophistry”

Imane Karich: “Theory and practice of Islamic finance”

Luc van Liedekerke: “The economics of time preference” | “Time-preference and climate change”

Michaël Bauwens: “Time, money and God: metaphysical investigations”

Target group

Master and PhD students in philosophy, economics or theology, but open to advanced Bachelor, Master and PhD students in these three or closely related fields like Islamic finance, sustainable finance and others. Participants should have at least completed two full years of undergraduate education (Bachelor level). 

For more information: https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/summer-winter-schools/time-money-god/

‘Finance, Law, and Sustainability: the EU sustainable finance action plan’

A Phinance Online Seminar by Boudewijn de Bruin on 25 November 2021, 17:00 CET

Open to the public. Zoom link: https://uniroma1.zoom.us/j/83148274093

Finance, law, and sustainability are more and more interconnected.
When law takes over, important questions must be asked. What is the power of legislation and litigation, and what legal instruments and tactics are appropriate? Boudewijn will zoom in on legislative initiatives around sustainable finance deriving from the Action Plan Financing Sustainable Growth published by the European Commission in 2018.

He will discuss the appropriateness of various instruments proposed in the Action Plan, using a reflexive law approach coupled with insights from behavioural economics and epistemology. He will point to the challenges such an approach encounters, and gesture at some tentative suggestions on how to address them.

This meeting of the Phinance Online Seminars will discuss Boudwjin’s view with contributions from Arnaud Van Caenegem (KU Leuven), Joakim Sandberg (University of Gothenburg), and Boudewijn himself, which will be followed by an open debate.

Workshop: Extreme wealth as a moral problem

Date: 13-14 November 2019.
Location: Emil-Figge-Str. 50, 44127 Dortmund (Germany), room 0.442
Organisers: Christian Neuhäuser and Dick Timmer

Attendance is free. Limited number of places available. Please register via k.d.timmer@uu.nl or Christian.Neuhaeuser@udo.edu.

Questions about the accumulation of wealth have acquired a new urgency in recent years. Economic inequality is fierce and still rising, both within countries and on a global level. It contributes to, among other things, social and political inequality and distributive unfairness. In light of this, there is a pressing need for work in normative political theory that engages closely with the question of what the justice has to say about the rich and their wealth. Are there distinctive features about the rich compared to the ‘merely’ affluent that we should worry about in particular? Should there be limits to how much wealth and income people can appropriate? And what kinds of institutions and policies are most defensible in curtailing the harmful effects of extreme wealth?

In this workshop, we want to consider the place extreme wealth should have in thinking about justice. We do this by critically examining ‘limitarianism’, which is the view in distributive justice which advocates that it is not morally permissible to have more resources than are needed to fully flourish in life. Ingrid Robeyns (2018) has coined and defended this view, arguing for limits on wealth in order to protect political equality and meet unmet urgent needs.

Provisional schedule

13th November
16.00-17.00: Ingrid Robeyns (Utrecht), “Economic limitarianism: merely moral or also political?”
17.15-18.15: Alan Thomas (York), “Limitarianism and the Political Problem of the Rich”
19.00: Dinner

14th November
9.00-10.00: Stefan Gosepath (Berlin), “Problems with too much (inherited) wealth”
10.15-11.15: Tammy Harel Ben Shahar (Haifa), “Limitarianism and Relative Thresholds”
11.30-12.30: Alexandru Volacu (Bucharest) “Some Reasons to Qualify Orthodox Limitarianism”
12.30-14.00: Lunch
14.00-15.00: Annelien De Dijn (Utrecht), “Republicanism and egalitarism”
15.15-16.15: Lasse Nielsen (Odense), “Limitarianism and social flourishing”
16.30-17.30: Dick Timmer (Utrecht) & Huub Brouwer (Utrecht) “Earning Too Much: The Case For Maximum Income Policies”
19.00 Dinner

Rethinking Finance Conference

Where: BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo
When: April 12 – 13, 2018

The Rethinking Finance Conference is organized as a cooperation between Rethinking Economics Norway, The Center for Financial Regulation at the Norwegian Business School BI, the Finance Watch and the INET YSI Financial Stability WG. Main confirmed speakers are Sheila Dow, Ann Pettifor, Daniela Gabor and Rohan Grey.

More information will be launched soon at www.rethinkingeconomicsnorge.com/
rethinking-finance/

ALSO NOTE: The INET YSI Financial Stability working group (WG) is organising a workshop as part of the Rethinking Finance Conference in Oslo on April 14th, 2018. The purpose of this workshop is to invite young scholars to present their work and discuss “Finance in the 21st Century” as well as related financial stability issues across the world.

Limited travel support and accommodation will be offered. The deadline for submitting the abstracts and short statements is February 10th, 2018. Please send your abstracts to: fs@youngscholarsinitiative.org

Finance and Social Justice webinar series

The INET Young Scholars Initiative (YSI) and the Bayreuth Philosophy and Economics program are organising a webinar series on the philosophy of financial institutions, from Monday 17/10 to Friday 4/11.

Run by Jens van’t Klooster and Marco Meyer, the webinar will also feature Dirk Bezemer and Martin O’Neill. Topics include money creation, central bank independence, monetary policy, and economic inequality.

More info at: http://finance-and-justice-conference.org/webinars/