Financial Ethics Workshop – September 16-17

The Financial Ethics Research Group (University of Gothenburg, Sweden) is organizing its first “Financial Ethics Workshop” on September 16-17. See the detailed schedule below.

The workshop will be held on zoom. Registration is free but mandatory. Please send an email to <louis.larue.2@gu.se> no later than September 14.

Following the workshop, a planned book on the philosophy of money and finance, edited by Joakim Sandberg and Lisa Warenski, is due to be published by Oxford University Press.

Note: Time indicated below is UCT+2 (Central European Summer Time)

Thursday 16 SeptemberTitle
10h30 – Joakim Sandberg (University of Gothenburg )Welcome address.
11h Adrian Walsh (University of New England, Australia)Financial Ethics and the Moral Status of the Profit Motive
12h Lunch 
13h Boudewijn de Bruin (University of Groningen)Reflexive Law and Epistemic Virtues: The EU Sustainable Finance Action Plan
14h Richard Endörfer (University of Gothenburg)What precisely is Wrong with Banks Contributing to Financial Crises?
15h Break 
15h30 Lisa Warenski (CUNY)Epistemic Dimensions of Culture and Conduct
16h30 Aaron James (University of California, Irvine)Rawls, Lerner, and the Tax-and-Spend Booby Trap
Friday 17 September 
9h30 – Welcome 
10h Marco Meyer (University of Hamburg)Credit and Distributive Justice
11h Christopher J. Cowton (Huddersfield Business School)Truth in financial accounting
12h Lunch 
13h Clément Fontan (UCLouvain)Beating around the (green) bush: central banks in face of the environmental meltdown.
14h Joshua Preiss (Minnesota State University)Freedom and the Ends of Financial Market Reform

Conference on Climate Change Adaptation Finance, September 6-7

The programme for the conference on “Climate Change Adaptation Finance: Normative and Empirical Perspectives” is now online. It includes a Keynote by Stacy-Ann Robinson (accessible without registration) and a Panel Discussion with representatives from governments, NGOs, policy advice and science. The full programme and further information are available at: https://www.adjust-climate.org/en/conference-2021/

The online conference takes place from September 6 to 7 and registration is free. Just send an email to Jochen Heubach (jheubach@philsem.uni-kiel.de) until September 1, saying that you want to participate in the conference.

The conference brings together leading scholars working on adaptation finance who will present their work on topics such as risk reduction, justice & equity, access to finance, reporting and allocative issues. From a variety of perspectives and disciplines, it aims at discussing how to achieve an effective and fair distribution of available adaptation finance and how to increase that funding.

Summer School on “The Workings of Capital: Perspectives on Exploitation in Law, Labor, and Distribution”

When: July 15-17, 2021

Where: The school will be held online. We will monitor existing conditions and regulations, and if possible, we will move the event to a blended format, featuring on-campus lectures and online sessions. In case of a blended format, the event will be hosted at the Auditorium of the Institute of Letters and Human Sciences (ILCH) at the ​University of Minho, Braga.

Organization: This event is co-organized by the Centre for Ethics, Politics, and Society of the University of Minho, and the Philosophy Department of the University of York

Convenors: Catarina Neves, Daniele Santoro, and Pedro Teixeira

Speakers:  Martin O’Neill (University of York), Katharina Pistor (Columbia University), João Rodrigues (Universidade de Coimbra), Nicholas Vrousalis (University of Rotterdam)

Website: https://12thsummerschoolcepsbraga.weebly.com

Description
Since Marx’s early theorization, exploitation has been identified as a defining feature of the capitalist mode of production. Exploitation sheds light on the causes of the unfair distribution of resources, opportunities, and wealth, the commodification of the labor market, as well as the plundering of natural resources. It also has the normative significance of both a moral wrongdoing and a structural aspect of an unjust system that calls for change, activism, and revolution once again. As inequalities soar and the concentration of wealth lacerates the social fabric of traditional welfare state societies, the exploitative nature of late-stage capitalism has drawn the attention of a new generation of political philosophers, both in the critical and the analytical tradition.

How does capitalist exploitation take place through legal, distribution, and productive means?  How should we understand the conceptual and normative dimensions of exploitation, and what policies should be pursued to create a less exploitative form of production? The goal of the 12th edition is to answer this question by exploring the role exploitation plays within new forms of capitalist production.

The critique of capitalism is a recurrent theme of the School. In past editions, we discussed alternatives to the existing capitalist regime, such as property-owning democracy (2014) and democratic socialism (2018). We also questioned the legitimacy of free-market capitalism and the role of corporations (2019). 

Our aim in this edition is to elucidate the concept of exploitation, investigate its distributive implications for public policy, its impact on labor and the labor market, and the legal framework enabling exploitative processes.

Among the questions we are particularly interested in debating are the following:   

  • What is exploitation? Is exploitation always unjust? How to distinguish exploitation from other forms of moral wrongdoing?
  • What taxonomy of exploitation can we identify in capitalistic and socialist regimes?
  • Are new forms of exploitation essentially distinct from traditional forms of exploitation?
  • Which are the forms of labor most affected by current forms of exploitation? How can decommodification mitigate individuals’ exploitation in the labor market?
  • How can policies of predistribution and/or redistribution address issues of exploitation?
  • Can egalitarian policies mitigate exploitation, and if so, which ones are the most effective?
  • Can exploitation happen in an egalitarian society, and what can we do about it?
  • What is the role of the law in perpetuating inequality and exploitation, especially through financial markets?

Format

The school will take place over three days. Two invited lectures will be delivered each day. We invite the participation of Ph.D. students, postdoctoral scholars, and established researchers to join us in the discussion and present their ongoing work on these topics or any related theme. Abstract proposals should not exceed 500 words. To submit a proposal, visit the School’s website.

Deadline for Abstract submission: May 30, 2021
Applicants who only wish to attend the summer school, and do not want to submit a proposal, should only register for the event (see information below).

Participation

Due to travel restrictions that could still affect on-site participation next Summer, the School is being organized in a digital format this year. We hope that delivering the event online will encourage proposals from many who might be hesitating to commit to an in-person event, giving the current uncertainty. We will follow the changes in travel restrictions and the regulations in Portugal regarding international academic events. In case the situation changes, we will consider a blended format for the school, and we will inform all participants. More information about the format will be provided closer to the date of the school. For now, participants will be asked to submit their preferences for the school’s format.

The participation fee is 30 Euros in case the school takes place online. In case we are able to organize a partial in-person event, we will ask participants to increase the fee up to 50 Euros to cover expenses.  Detailed information about registration and payment procedures are available on the School’s website.

Deadline for registration: June 20, 2021. ​​

Information about the program and the school format will be available later on the website. 

For other queries, contact: 12thbragasummerschool@gmail.com

Climate Futures Workshop 2021: Climate Solutions, Money, and Politics

Asynchronous / Online / June 16-30

https://cfi-onlineworkshop.net/2021-cfa

All solutions to climate change—whether mitigation, adaptation, or compensation—play out against a backdrop of domestic and global financial, economic, and political systems. Proposed climate solutions raise issues of justice as well as politics and finance. The complex interplay of these issues calls for conversation and collaboration across disciplinary boundaries.

Visions of a Just Transition, a Green New Deal, or a Green Recovery from COVID-19 have captivated imaginations: but to what extent should responses to climate change be intertwined with radical social, economic, or political transformation? Fossil fuel companies facing asset stranding have obstructed climate solutions: but do they hold the key to developing carbon dioxide removal technologies? Renewable energy remains generally capital-intensive: how can we incentivise breakthrough innovations? Future generations will benefit significantly from action on climate change today: should we “borrow from the future” to fund a clean energy transition?

Facilitating conversations addressing such questions is the aim of this year’s Climate Futures Workshop. We outline some other possible questions below:

Broad

  • What role should we take self-interest to play in climate finance and politics, and how should self-interested motivations be constrained and channeled?
  • Is it feasible or desirable for future generations to bear any of the costs of current mitigation measures?
  • How do climate solutions connect with social movements for political and climate justice?

Narrow

  • Can fossil-fuel firms transform themselves from part of the problem to part of the solution? Can and should they be forgiven for their past roles in causing climate change and obstructing action to mitigate it? What kinds of constructive contributions can they offer? How can the various resources of fossil-fuel companies be redirected for developing climate solutions?
  • Developed countries agreed in Paris to a goal of “mobilising” $100bn per year by 2020 in climate finance. How should “mobilisation” be understood? How can climate finance be made more effective?
  • Can payments for ecosystem services such as natural carbon sinks be both just and effective?
  • What balance of command-and-control or pricing instruments will best achieve climate justice?
  • What role should economic measurements of the social cost of carbon play in setting climate policy, given the theoretical and practical difficulties of an accurate assessment?
  • Is buying fossil fuel reserves in order to keep them in the ground a feasible strategy?
  • Can changes in corporate governance incentivise increased investment in climate change adaptation?

Presenters

  • Robert Keohane
  • John Broome
  • Rebecca Henderson
  • Michael Oppenheimer
  • Simon Caney
  • Alyssa Bernstein
  • Paul Kelleher
  • Rachel Kyte
  • Angel Hsu
  • Alexandre Gajevic Sayegh
  • Matto Mildenberger
  • Jessica Green
  • Thea Riofrancos

Organizers

The Climate Futures Workshop 2021 is sponsored by the Climate Futures Initiative, the High Meadows Environmental Institute, and the Center for Human Values at Princeton University.

Essay Contest ‘The Future of Capitalism in Europe’

The Future Markets Consultation invites students and young scholars to submit their ideas on a sustainable and just market economy for Europe in the shape of an essay. A prize is available in three categories: (1) bachelor students, (2) master & PhD students and (3) young scholars until 35 years.

What we are looking for
The length of your essay should be at most 3,500 words including notes and references. Your essay should be aimed at an educated, yet non-academic public. A preference will be given to essays that do not just analyze the current situation, but also suggest ways to move forward.

What happens to your essay
All essays will be taken into account as input for the final report of the Future Markets Consultation. A selection of the best essays will be published on both the consultation website and on the Moral Markets portal.

Essay topics
You can write an essay on any topic that is of relevance to the consultation, including but not limited to:

  • Markets, government & civil society
  • How to deal with growing inequality
  • The desirability & necessity of economic growth
  • Sustainability & markets
  • Economics & the common good
  • Democratizing the economy
  • The role of civil society in capitalism
  • Business as a force for good
  • Dealing with corporate power concentrations
  • The role of work in the economy of the future
  • Reforming finance & financial institutions
  • The mix of global & local / smart globalisation
  • The spiritual & moral foundations of capitalism
  • The potential for cooperatives
  • Stimulating sustainable growth
  • True pricing

For more suggestions for relevant topics, please check our website.

Deadline: 3 January December 2021
For information on the essay contest, please visit:
https://www.moralmarkets.org/futuremarketsconsultation/activities/essay-contest/

Call for Abstracts: Workshop on Social Finance, Impact Investing and the Financialization of the Public Interest

We welcome paper proposals for an academic conference in Hamburg, Germany, on Social Finance, Impact Investing, and the Financialization of the Public Interest

Date: 23-24 March 2017

Conveners: Eve Chiapello (EHESS Paris) and Lisa Knoll (University of Hamburg)

Submission deadline for paper proposals to siconf2017(at)ehess.fr : 2 November 2016 500 to 800 words plus references.

Continue reading

CFP: Philosophy of Economics Section at DGPhil

We invite submissions for the Philosophy of Economics section at the XXIV. Congress of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Philosophie (DGPhil) to be held from the 24th to the 27th of September 2017 in Berlin.

Potential topics for the Philosophy of Economics section range from the philosophical foundations of economic theories and explanations, via critical analyses of economic structures, the reflection on the relation between economy and society from the perspective of social philosophy, to issues of business ethics and normative questions of economic governance. Potential questions include: Continue reading

CFP: Special Issue on “Ethics in Financial Markets”

Global Finance Journal, Call for Papers

Guest Editor: Hoje Jo, Santa Clara University

In corporate finance and investment practices, corporate social responsibility (CSR), socially responsible investing (SRI), and business ethics have become a crucial part of managerial concerns for firms around the world because the issues of social responsibility, business ethics, sustainability, socially responsible investing, employee relations, workforce diversity, climate change, and the environment have emerged as some of the most important factors for managerial decision making in recent years. However, there has been considerable debate over whether CSR activities can be beneficial for shareholder value.

There are two competing explanations: agency theory and stakeholder value maximization theory. Continue reading

Workshop: “Between ethics and efficiency? The political theory of corporate governance”

When? – December 8th/9th, 2016
Where? – Hochschule für Politik München / Bavarian School of Public Policy, Munich

In political theory, questions about corporate governance have made a comeback in debates about the nature of corporations, the conceptualization of economic power, human rights responsibilities of corporations, and questions about workplace democracy. As recent scandals such as the Global Financial Crisis or VW’s diesel emissions scandal show, wrongdoing by or within business corporations can have wide-ranging consequences for the societies within which they operate. Such events cause not only massive economic harm, but also moral harm, for example by illegitimately infringing on the rights of third parties or by polluting the environment. This interdisciplinary workshop brings together experts from the fields of philosophy, political theory, business ethics and law in order to discuss these themes. The aim is to discuss cutting-edge research (work in progress) from these fields and to explore further possibilities of interdisciplinary inquiry.

Papers for most presentations will be pre-circulated and we will go directly into the discussion. Participation is free, but registration is required (first come, first serve). Abstracts available upon request. Please email lisa.herzog@hfp.tum.de to register. Continue reading

Post-doctoral Fellowship on Crowdfunding

The Centre for European Research in Microfinance (CERMi) is a multilingual, international research centre based in Belgium (www.cermi.eu). CERMi is offering a full time one-year research fellowship on crowdfunding, at the Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management (SBS-EM), ULB.

Created in 2007, CERMi draws together European researchers in microfinance. Currently, it gathers 9 doctoral students and 2 post-doctoral students working on social finance and a wide international network of more than 30 research associates.

The post-doctoral fellow will work under the supervision of Prof. Marek Hudon, Professor at SBS-EM and in collaboration with Dr. Anaïs Périlleux (UCL). The fellow should start in October 2016. The fellow will be based in Brussels.

For more information, please contact Ms. Anne-Lise Remy at cermi@ulb.ac.be and Prof. Marek Hudon, mhudon@ulb.ac.be Continue reading